Ideal Wines to Serve This Winter

Winter is the perfect season to stay in and enjoy wine. Here’s what Ideal Wine Company is reaching for when the temperatures drop.

Ideal wine company winter wines
Here are our ideal wines to serve this winter.

Nebbiolo – pleasant with surprising form and grip

Nebbiolo is a deceiving wine. While its appearance is pale and pleasant, it is often compared to a Pinot Noir, it has many unexpected qualities. With a high acidity and grippy tannins, which give the wine form and grip, you won’t forget this red quickly. Showcasing complex rose, cherry and leather flavours, this complex wine will keep you satisfied. It pairs well with winter squash, mushrooms, truffles and charcuterie, making a perfect accompaniment to plenty of winter foods.

Sangiovese – earthy and rustic

A high-acid and high-tannin Italian wine is a must have for this colder and darker season. A traditional Sangiovese is the perfect wine to enjoy with all kinds of winter foods, including roasted winter vegetables and hard cheeses. Its earthy and rustic notes bring smoky overtones to the glass. As well, its complex nose is perfect for sitting and sniffing as you relax.

Shiraz – rugged and fruity

When it comes to winter, we all enjoy something a bit more hearty and powerful. A Shiraz is the perfect answer to those needs. Described as big and brooding, this red is an ideal warmer. It is known for its powerful black fruit flavours and savoury undertones. It has a high ABV (coming in at around 14-15%) but if you can’t indulge at Christmas, when can you? It’s not for the faint of heart, but is a delicious choice for when it’s cold outside.

Cabernet Sauvignon – an undeniable classic

Cabernet Sauvignon is such a classic, it’s almost seen as a cliché this time of year. This speaks to the popularity of the wine this time of year. Undoubtedly a favourite of many, this wine is a layered and complex option. Pairing well with a seasonal roast and red meat, this fruity red is a staple of the season for good reason. Try an Old World variety for a surprisingly subtle option.

Chardonnay – rich and buttery

An oaked Chardonnay works well with the hearty food of the season. It’s lightness cuts through the richer fare and provides a palate cleanser between bites. This works particularly well with turkey, sea bass and gruyere cheese. Rich and buttery, this full-bodied white has dominant flavours of vanilla, butter and caramel, with a touch of citrus. Reminiscent of other holiday favourites, such as eggnog and hot buttered rum, a Chardonnay will pair wonderfully with your Christmas feast.

Champagne – light and refreshing

To add to a thoroughly festive season, Champagne brings a party atmosphere. It is light and versatile, providing a refreshing quality that is often overlooked. When it comes to winter food, it pairs well with so many favourites, from Christmas ham and bacon to cheeses and nuts. Whether you want to enjoy this at a party or celebrating at home, Champagne provides the perfect uplift to cure any winter blues. Try on Christmas Day or New Year’s Eve to properly celebrate the occasions!

With all the wines this time of year, it’s important to find one suited to your needs. A bold red is always a popular winter warmer, while a refreshing white provides a welcome respite from heavy foods and drinks this time of year. With many of us spending more time indoors due to the cold weather, what better way to do it than with a glass of wine?

The Best Wines for Italian Food

Wine and Italian food is a famous pairing. The rich notes of red wine or the light notes of white often work to enhance the flavours of your meal. But what should you look out for when pairing wine with a dish? Ideal Wine Company has plenty of recommendations to perfectly match your wine to your meal. It is best to focus on the sauce, to get the best pairing and so we’ve kept this in mind in our list of the best reds and whites for every occasion.

Ideal Wine Company Wine and Italian Food
We review which wines work best with Italian food.

Cabernet Sauvignon – hearty and rich

The primary taste of Cabernet Sauvignon is blackcurrant, but other overtones include blackberry and mint. This hearty and rich red wine pairs best with tomato-based red sauces, complimenting the richness of the sauce. This pairs well with lasagna as it balances the richness of the dish.  Try a medium-bodied Cabernet Sauvignon to really balance your dish.

Sauvignon Blanc – crisp and acidic

Sauvignon Blanc is typically very light, with notes of grass and apple and a soft, smoky flavour. This acidic white wine tends to be crisp, making it a nice match for a cream based sauce, balancing the richness of the dish. This would work well with a Pasta Alfredo, as it would cut through the creaminess of the sauce.

Pinot Noir – light and versatile

This delicious and earthy French wine is one of the most well-known red wines to pair with Italian food. It is a light red wine, with flavours that include earth, vanilla and jam. Its versatility makes it work best with a tomato-based red sauce and it also pairs well with a variety of Italian food. Try this with a pesto dish.

Chardonnay – an adaptable white wine

Chardonnay can taste semi-sweet or sour, heady or light, depending where the grapes are grown and how it’s processed. Typically, the flavours include apple, tangerine, lemon, lime, melon and oak. Like most white wines, it is best paired with cream or oil-based sauces, such as a Carbonara. However, a Chardonnay can also work well with a light tomato-based red sauce.

Italian Chianti – strong and bold

Chianti is a red wine from Tuscany and is one of the most popular wines among Italians, as it perfectly complements a wide range of Italian food. It is perfectly suited for flavourful, well-seasoned sauces, such as Bolognese, due to the strong and bold flavours. It pairs best with tomato-based red sauces but also works well with cream or oil-based sauces.

Riesling – ideal for light sauces

Riesling is usually made to be a sweet wine, but can also create a dry wine. The taste of this wine is usually affected by where it is grown, as Californian Rieslings tend to be dry and have a melon taste, while German Rieslings are tarter and have a grapefruit flavour. Dry Riesling is an ideal wine for vegetarian dishes or light sauces, in addition to seafood and chicken. Often, it is best to pair a dry Riesling with simple fish, chicken or pasta dishes that have some acid to them. Particularly, this pairs well with a risotto, complimenting the delicate flavours without overpowering them. It is best to avoid pairing this wine with any strong sauces, especially those that are tomato-based.

Demand for Australian Fine Wine Rises in the Past Year

New export figures have shown the Ideal Wine Company that demand for Australian fine wine has increased in the past year.

The growth of the Australian fine wine industry

Australia has spent the last 200 years making wine. Its efforts are starting to pay off, as the land down has started to develop a reputation for making excellent wine in the past few decades. Now it produces vintages that rival those made by established powers in the fine wine trade such as France, Spain and Italy.

There are regions in the south of Australia that have the temperate climate and ideal soil types needed to produce first class vino. This has allowed areas such as Victoria, Queensland, Tasmania and New South Wales to become famous for their ability to produce quality grapes such as Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot and Pinot Noir.

The AGWA Wine Export Approval Report March 2015

New export figures published in a report by the Australian Grape and Wine Authority (AGWA) show that demand for Australian fine wine has continued to surge. AGWA’S Wine Export Approval Report March 2015 shows that the land down under registered a 3.6% rise in volume and a 3.9% in the value of its wine exports between March 2014 and March 2015.

AGWA CEO Andreas Clarke was quoted by Drinks Business explaining the role fine wine played in this surge. Clarke explained that “some of the strongest growth is seen in the premium price segments.” The CEO went on to explain that “while the above A$7.50 price segment accounts for just 5% of total export volume, the value share is considerably higher at 27%.”

Demand for Australian fine wine has risen in Asia

Clarke also pointed out that a fair share of this growth can be attributed to the rising popularity of Australian fine wines in Asian markets such as China. The world’s largest continent accounted for more than half of exports of Australian wines priced above A$7.50 in the year to March 2015; a rise of 13% from the year before.

Andrew Caillard MW, who established Langton’s (Australia’s fine wine classification system) agreed with Clarke. He was quoted by another Drinks Business article saying that “Australia is really making its best wine now. We’re seeing iconic vintages year after year and Asia, especially China, is leading the demand for top-end wine.”

Find out why everybody loves Australian fine wine

Therefore demand for Australian fine wine is rising across the world, especially in Asia, because people are coming to realise what a fantastic product it really is. Find out why it’s rising in popularity by sampling a selection of Australian fine wines from the Ideal Wine Company.

Ideal Wine Company Review the Dom Perignon 2000

Ideal Wine Company review the Dom Perignon 2000 and tell you what you need to know about this fantastic luxury tipple.

This week we’d Ideal Wine Company review our current Champagne of choice; the Dom Perginon 2000.

The ultimate luxury tipple

The Ideal Wine Company exists for one purpose. We strive to bring you a wide range of top range tipples including wines, Cognacs and Ports, for prices you can actually afford.

We couldn’t establish ourselves as a provider of luxury alcoholic products without doing everything we could to build up a varied Champagne list. Champagne is the ultimate drink of luxury; the product most consumers choose to quaff when they want to celebrate!

Moet and Chandon’s prestige brand

Nothing says luxury like Dom Perignon. This is a brand of vintage champagne produced by the Champagne House, Moet and Chandon. Named after a monk who was crucial to the development of Champagne, Dom Perignon is Moet and Chandon’s prestige brand.

Dom Perginon is typically made from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes. This can often give Dom Perginon a seductive quality that makes it a hit with wine enthusiasts across the world. Dom Perignon only supplies vintage Champagnes; as a rule of thumb it doesn’t blend grapes from different years.

The Dom Perignon 2000

We stock several Dom Perignons here at the Ideal Wine Company. This includes the Dom Perginon Brut 1996, the Dom Perignon Rose 1996 and the Dom Perignon 2000.

Although the youngest vintage on this list, the Dom Perignon 2000 is a stellar bottle which has the ability to entrance wine enthusiasts every bit as much as its older competitors. This classic white wine Champagne is a vibrant drink which bursts the minute it hits your palate, releasing scintillating tones of aniseed, ginger, pear and mango. Its characteristic bite makes it the perfect vintage for the summer.

Everything a Champagne should be

You need to buy the Dom Perignon 2000 because it’s everything a Champagne should be; decadent, flavourful and destined to provide you with a wine drinking experience you’ll ever forget. You can purchase the Dom Perignon 2000 from the Ideal Wine Company for as little as £140 per bottle.

Take a look at our blog to see what luxury drinks the Ideal Wine Company review this time next week.