Which lesser known wines are worth investing in?

Ideal Wine Company - lesser known wines

Are lesser known wines worth exploring for investment purposes? We certainly think so. Classic wines from Bordeaux and Burgundy dominate the fine wine investment market, for good reason. These regions have a long and storied history of winemaking that investors trust.

But as investors buy up the best wines, they become rarer and prices rise. It means that it can be harder to find wine investments that offer good value.

One way to find value in this crowded fine wine market is by investing in a vintage from lesser known wine regions.

Which lesser known wines are worth investing in?

Winemaking is now a global phenomenon. Producers are springing up in plenty of new markets, particularly in Asia. But too often, investors overlook other traditional wine producing countries. Greece, Austria, Croatia and even Hungary are all well worth exploring for opportunities.

Here our guide to some of the best wines from these lesser known wine regions.

China – Ao Yun, 2013

In recent years China has fully embraced wine making. One of the most popular producers is Ao Yun. They produce their wines in the foothills of the Himalayas. Their wines use both local grapes as well wines based on as old classics like Cabernet Sauvignon. Our choice is the first vintage from Ao Yun, the 2013 red. The wine shows off its producer’s attention to detail, and it’s fine on the palate. A great advert for Chinese wines, and a maker worth watching for investors.

Greece – Douloufakis Dafnios, 2016

The wonderfully varied landscape of Greece is full of unique producers, but Eastern Mediterranean wines can be ignored by investors. And increasingly, many of them make high quality wines that are worth considering from an investment perspective. 

If you’re looking for an interesting white wine to invest in, consider one from Crete. Our pick is this white wine from the Douloufakis Winery, which has been making wines on the island since the 1930s. That expertise shines through in this mellow, citrusy white with a flavour hints of jasmine.

Austria – Johanneshof Reinisch Rotgipfler, 2016

Austria has a rich winemaking tradition and it is worth hunting down some of their more unusual grape varieties. For example, local winemakers harvest the rare Rotgipfler grape from a tiny area south of Vienna.

One of our favourite producers from this region is the excellent Johanneshof Reinisch winery south of Vienna. They produce a wonderful Rotgipfler, full of zesty freshness and a real depth. Our pick is their 2016 Satzing Rotgipfler, which is a high quality white wine and an excellent vintage that investors should look up.

Hungary – Tokaji Furmint, 2015

Tokaji is a Hungarian institution but is sometimes overlooked by fine wine investors. Producers make Tokaji from ‘botrytized’ grapes, which creates a sweet, intense white wine with a refreshing acidity.

Vines used to make Tokaji are prone to rot, which makes it harder to grow than other varieties. As a result, some Tokaji producers now use the grapes to make dry white wines. There are some interesting opportunities here for investors. Any wine from the Szepsy winery is worth investigating, and our pick is the earthy 2015 Tokaji Furmint.

Croatia – Miloš Stagnum, 2007

If you’re looking for a wine that will just get better and better with age, then look no further than Croatia’s plavac mali wines. This is the most famous red wine variety in the country, produced on the Dalmatian coast in ideal wine making conditions. Aged in barrels, the wines have a bold, fruity flavour profile. Our pick is the Miloš Stagnum 2007. It’s wonderfully well-balanced, with a rich, complex mix of fruit and figs.